What To Do If Your Close To Eviction

 In Blog, Tips for Real Estate

If you find yourself near eviction then this must be a very scary time for you and your family. The stress can seem overwhelming but we’re here to tell you that it’s going to be okay. Many people have been in your situations and made it through them. It’s not going to be easy but that’s where we come in to make the hard times a little less difficult.

 

 

Notice The Notice

The type of eviction that’s occurring to you depends on the type of notice before getting evicted. Knowing the type is important so that you are ready for any actions the landlord might take. This also helps you prepare any defense you need to make as well as how much time you have. Make sure you take any notice you receive seriously and check to make sure it’s legit.

 

 

 

Types Of Notices

Notice to Pay Rent or Quit.  For nonpayment of rent evictions, Nevada law requires a five-day notice to the tenant that tells the tenant to either pay the rent or “quit” (vacate) the premises.

 

Notice to Quit for Nuisance, Waste, Assigning/Subletting, Unlawful Business, or Drug Violation. Evictions for nuisance, waste, improper assignment/subletting, unlawful business, or Drug Violation require a three-day notice to the tenant that describes the alleged nuisance, improper assignment/sublet, or unlawful business, or the like, followed by a five-day notice that tells the tenant to leave because tenant’s presence is now unlawful.

 

Notice to Perform Lease Condition or Quit.   Lease violation evictions require a five-day notice to the tenant that describes the lease violation and directs the tenant to either “cure” (fix or correct) the violation or leave, followed by a second five-day notice that tells the tenant to leave because retaining possession of the premises is now unlawful.

 

Notice to Quit for Tenancy-at-Will.   Tenancy-at-will evictions require a five-day notice to the tenant that says the tenancy-at-will is terminating and the tenant must leave, followed by a second five-day notice instructing the tenant to leave because tenant’s presence on the property is now unlawful.

 

Seven-Day or Thirty-Day “No Cause” Notice to Quit. No-cause evictions require a thirty-day notice to the tenant (or a seven-day notice if the tenant pays rent weekly), followed by a five-day notice instructing the tenant to leave because retaining possession of the premises is now unlawful.

 

 

 

Time To Take Action

Take a careful look through your notice to see how long you have to take action and if you even want to take action. If you believe you can challenge the notice then go for it but make sure you go through the process as peacefully as possible because no matter what if you end up staying you’ll have the same landlord.

 

 

Prepare For The Worst

Don’t let the gloom and doom become you in this situation. You can handle it and also prepare for the worst case scenario. Have a backup place for you and your family to temporarily stay just in case. If the place you’re staying now isn’t someplace you want to stay at anyway start to make plans for a new location.

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